a slave to the details / contact history

Le Diable, Probablement (Robert Bresson, 1977)

Le Diable, Probablement (Robert Bresson, 1977)

Le Diable, Probablement (Robert Bresson, 1977)

Mossafer (Abbas Kiarostami, 1974)

Moe no suzaku (Naomi Kawase, 1997)

Moe no suzaku (Naomi Kawase, 1997)

espergesiaESPERGESIAhttp://espergesia.tumblr.com/post/91913125864http://upontheoceanfloor.tumblr.com/post/69784916752

Wang Chien-Wen (王晶文), the protagonist in Hou Hsiao-Hsien(侯孝賢) ‘s film Dust in the Wind, passed away yesterday.

photo by Liu Chen-Hsiang (劉振祥), 1986.

iwanttobelikearollingstoneA Type Of Distraction.http://iwanttobelikearollingstone.tumblr.com/post/92225708011/shihlun-wang-chien-wen-the-protagonisthttps://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=670129786&sk=photos&collection_token=670129786%3A2305272732%3A69&set=a.10152249546504787.1073741825.670129786

"There are always bits of myself in my films but sometimes people don’t know that. I used to feel very distant from my films. In my earlier films, I really kept myself out of the picture. But now every film is more or less a personal experience, from dreams or from people close to me. That’s why I keep making films in certain locations. They are mostly places where I cherish my childhood memories. I keep revisiting them to try to—how do you say—reinterpret my memories. […] I think this is one of the reasons I make films: my personal memories are always interwoven with those from various other sources, reading, listening and traveling (my own travels and those of others). It was hard then to remember the real past clearly, so I made films without knowing how true they really were. This was an important detail; it was like waking the dead and giving them a new soul, making them walk once more. It is the same when writing, sometimes it is just our imagination, arising from our desire to remember, as Gabriel García Márquez wrote: ‘The memory is clear but there is no possibility that it is true.’" — Apichatpong Weerasethakul

weerasethakulthe southhttp://weerasethakul.tumblr.com/post/91987039519/there-are-always-bits-of-myself-in-my-films-buthttp://strangewood.tumblr.com/post/91981423892/there-are-always-bits-of-myself-in-my-films-but
Andy Warhol, Empire, 1964.
'…what is the real relation of a film like Empire to the working day whose duration it adopts? A utopian alternative that shadows work-time only to supplant and overthrow it, an incitement to the wasteful, luxuriant pleasures of the idle spectator; or a temporal mimicry that points rather to the desire to approximate the character of work in its monotony and boredom? Few, after all, would describe sitting through Empire as a pleasure, idle or not. Alienating its spectators and emphasising the absurd, thing-like impassivity of its performers, this cinema might be seen to encode the experience of labour as presented in anti-capitalist critique - though whether such depiction is always straightforwardly critical, whether it does not betray perverse forms of investment, is itself a moot point. Alternatively, this cinema’s very emphasis on non-activity, its embrace of chance occurrence and its unmotivated excesses of duration might be seen to challenge work as calculated, purposeful activity and efficiently deployed time.’
- Jonathan L. Owen, ‘The Migrations of Factory Style’, in Ewa Mazierska, ed., Work in Cinema: Labour and the Human Condition, London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2013, p.230.

Andy Warhol, Empire, 1964.

'…what is the real relation of a film like Empire to the working day whose duration it adopts? A utopian alternative that shadows work-time only to supplant and overthrow it, an incitement to the wasteful, luxuriant pleasures of the idle spectator; or a temporal mimicry that points rather to the desire to approximate the character of work in its monotony and boredom? Few, after all, would describe sitting through Empire as a pleasure, idle or not. Alienating its spectators and emphasising the absurd, thing-like impassivity of its performers, this cinema might be seen to encode the experience of labour as presented in anti-capitalist critique - though whether such depiction is always straightforwardly critical, whether it does not betray perverse forms of investment, is itself a moot point. Alternatively, this cinema’s very emphasis on non-activity, its embrace of chance occurrence and its unmotivated excesses of duration might be seen to challenge work as calculated, purposeful activity and efficiently deployed time.’

- Jonathan L. Owen, ‘The Migrations of Factory Style’, in Ewa Mazierska, ed., Work in Cinema: Labour and the Human Condition, London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2013, p.230.

exhaustedscreenThe Exhausted Screenhttp://exhaustedscreen.tumblr.com/post/92037629752/andy-warhol-empire-1964-what-is-the-real

Yesterday Girl (Alexander Kluge, 1966)

darkmylightليلىhttp://darkmylight.tumblr.com/post/91973492749/yesterday-girl-alexander-kluge-1966